permanent hair loss hair loss treatment news

Studies have shown that rubbing green tea into hair may help curb hair loss problem. All you need to do is brew two bags of green tea in one cup of water, leave to cool and thereafter, apply it to your hair. Rinse your hair thoroughly after an hour. To see results, practice this regularly for a week to ten days.

Hair color can also be helpful. According to Beverly Hills colorist Michael Canale, “Peroxide doubles the thickness of each strand. It swells the hair shaft…” Strategically placed highlights can detract from thin patches by making your hair closer to the color of your scalp.

The same goes for hair loss after childbirth or following cancer treatment – in most cases hair is restored. Even with alopecia areata, the sudden hair loss experienced by TV presenter Gail Porter that leaves bald patches, hair often grows back, although the problem can recur.

Hair loss can occur after a significant physiological strain, such as a prolonged illness or crash dieting, which may leave you deficient in iron, B12, or protein—all vital to healthy hair growth. An emotionally trying event, like a divorce, can also lead to allover thinning three to four months later, when the hairs that were forming under the scalp at the time finally make (or don’t make) their appearance. Usually the hair will grow back in a few months. If a nutrient deficiency is the cause, your doctor can help you supplement your diet.

There is another type of female hair loss, however, that is less dramatic and less visible, but can be incredibly distressing. The hair thins gradually, often over decades, around the top frontal area and extending back to the crown. It can start at any age, is progressive and inherited.

Although, as discussed previously, shedding is completely normal, if there is an excessive loss of hair, consulting with a doctor or medical professional can help diagnose the The sooner you speak with someone regarding your hair loss and any associated symptoms, the sooner a solution can be found for you.

There you have it. As of now, ‘The big three’ (minoxidil, finasteride, and ketoconazole) are still the best treatment for male pattern baldness. And, well, one could say even a cure, since if you start treating your hair loss with these early on, you can quite likely hold on to your hair for a lifetime.

While dermatologists are not exactly sure how it works, Minoxidil seems to improve scalp circulation and extend the “anagen” phase of the hair cycle. As such, it only works while you use it. After three months, the hairs that extended their natural life-cycle will begin to shed. In most men, the medication itself will not cause the hair to shed. (ROGAINE® uses Minoxidil.)

The reason is that finasteride works to reverse miniaturization (the thinning and shortening of hairs due to DHT). Younger patients, with early hair loss, generally have more hair in the early stages of miniaturization where the changes are readily reversible.

Iron deficiency anemia is another common cause of hair loss, especially in women. Try and eat iron rich foods such as green leafy vegetables, beans and lentils, meat, liver, nuts and seeds. Pair it with vitamin C which helps with absorption of iron.

Another major cause of hair loss in women is heredity. Other names for this type of hair loss are Androgenetic Alopecia, female pattern hair loss, female pattern baldness or female pattern alopecia. A family with a history of hair loss in women will automatically make their present generation women more prone to this condition. In hereditary hair loss, the part line gradually starts thinning from the top of the head. But, it’ll suffice to say, that even in this condition, the hairline rarely recedes and almost never results in baldness.

Skeptics (among them, Dr. Wesley) are starting to come around after a 2014 randomized double-blind study published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology found a “statistically significant” difference in hair density for women who used a laser comb compared with those who used a sham device. (“Comb” is something of a misnomer. The device looks like a hairbrush crossed with a cordless phone; it is glided back and forth across the scalp, roughly a half-inch at a time, usually about 15 minutes three times a week.)

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