hair loss treatment for women hair loss treatment kuching

Thinning hair is an issue that’s faced by both men and women. In fact, according to the American Hair Loss Association, approximately 40% of hair loss experiences are incurred by women. Fortunately, there are effective ways to treat hair thinning. Check out the facts and ideas below if you want to learn exactly what causes your hair to thin and how to deal with this problem.

There are several options when it comes to conventional treatment of hair loss, all of which come with significant side effects unless you opt for a wig or hair piece. The most common conventional hair loss remedies include topical minoxidil, oral finasteride, topical or oral hormones and steroids, hair transplants, and hair restoration surgery. (13)

Some women ages 30 to 60 may notice a thinning of the hair that affects the entire scalp. The hair loss may be heavier at first, and then gradually slow or stop. There is no known cause for this type of telogen effluvium.

In some cases (particularly in women), a mineral deficiency is the cause of hair loss. “It’s important to make sure you don’t have a lack of something in your diet that could be leading to hair loss,” says dermatologist Dr. Carolyn Jacob. “We check protein levels, iron, iron storage, vitamin D and a number of other labs to make sure you don’t have deficiencies.” Spinach is iron rich and it contains sebum, which acts as a natural conditioner for hair. The leafy green also provides omega-3 acids, magnesium, potassium, calcium and iron. All help keep hair lustrous, shiny and, most importantly, out of the drain. Spinach is only one of the 8 Superfoods You Should Eat Every Day!

The causes of sudden hair loss in young women are variable and influenced by a complicated set of factors. These factors however, can generally be divided into psychological and physiological categories.

You’ve all seen the ads in the back of men’s magazines, you’ve heard the commercials on the radio and you’ve seen the infomercials promoting miracle treatments for hair loss. The bottom line is that the vast majority of advertised treatments do not work for the prevention and treatment of hair loss. If a hair loss treatment is not approved by the FDA or recommended by The American Hair Loss Association, chances are you are wasting your precious time and money. Remember, successful treatment of hair loss is greatly dependent on early intervention. It is critical to begin treatment with an effective product as soon as you notice the onset of hair loss.

If you’re going to use supplements with your hair in mind, tell your doctor before you start taking them. way, your doctor can watch out for any possible side effects, including interactions with other drugs you’re taking.

Women lose hair on an inherited (genetic) basis, too, but the female pattern tends to be more diffuse, with less likelihood of the crown and frontal hairline being lost. Although some women may notice hair thinning as early as their 20s, the pace of hair loss tends to be gradual, often taking years to become obvious to others. There seems to be a normal physiologic thinning that comes with age and occurs in many women in their early to mid-30s. More women have underlying causes of hair loss than men. These include treatable conditions like anemia and thyroid disease and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). These conditions are diagnosed by blood tests along with a historical and physical evidence. Although a few studies have suggested that baldness may be inherited through the mother’s family genes, these theories require further testing. Current studies are inconclusive. Although not indicated for female pattern balding, spironolactone (Aldactone) has had some success in treating this condition.

“This is the first time vitamin D’s possible role in hair loss has been highlighted,” explains Rania Mounir Abdel Hay, MD, a dermatologist at Cairo University, and co-author of the study. “It might regulate the expression of genes that promote normal hair follicle growth.” As for iron: Low levels may inhibit an essential enzyme that has been associated with hair loss in mice.

“Once that hair has stopped shedding, it does regrow, at a rate of about a centimeter a month,” said Dr. Senna, who suffered from the condition after each of her pregnancies. She shares photos of herself with patients, to show she can sympathize. In one, her entire frontal hairline clearly is growing back in. “If I’d used a treatment, I would have thought it was a miracle drug,” she said.

If you find yourself constantly pulling your hair into Croydon facelift (that’s a tight ponytail), then stop. The same goes for wearing hair extensions and excessive blow-drying, as they’re all putting strain on your hair follicles. In some cases, this can lead to traction alopecia.

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