frontal baldness hair loss treatment guidelines

Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition.[3] Intervention that can be tried include the medications minoxidil or finasteride, and hair transplant surgery.[4][5] Alopecia areata may be treated by steroid injections in the affected area but these need to be frequently repeated to be effective.[3] Hair loss is a common problem.[3] Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[3] About 2% of people develop alopecia areata at some point in time.[3]

Another treatment option is hair transplantation, in which tiny hair follicles taken from one area of the scalp are transplanted into the affected areas. It can be very effective and produce permanent results that are natural looking.

Wong explains it this way: “Female pattern hair loss is characterized by miniaturization of the hair follicles, where the hair follicles become smaller and produce shorter, thinner, more brittle hairs, and can eventually stop producing any hair.  The hair follicles not only miniaturize but also can become deleted with a decrease in total number of follicles.”

It’s hard to miss these periods of shedding, and the trauma of seeing your hair fall or noticing your scalp widen can bring out a range of emotions, from helplessness to just plain confusion. Find a dermatologist who, in their profile, specializes in hair loss, Dr. Senna says. They see hair loss often enough that they know how to handle can pinpoint your symptoms in a very systematic way. And if you’re very concerned, it’s also ok to skip the derm and go straight to a trichologist — they’re less easy to find, but incredibly skilled and well-equipped to get to the root of the problem.

Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like – if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size – with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.

What to do: Like men, women may benefit from minoxidil (Rogaine) to help grow hair, or at least, maintain the hair you have, Dr. Glashofer says. Rogaine is available over-the-counter and is approved for women with this type of hair loss.

Non-scarring alopecia: This potentially reversible type of hair loss is very common and can be due to many causes, including certain diseases, drugs, aging, diet, as well as a genetic predisposition for hair loss called androgenetic alopecia (common balding).

This form of alopecia typically results in bald patches developing on the head or elsewhere. The hairless areas may stay contained and hair may re-grow, or the hair loss can spread to include the scalp, facial area, and body.

Her hope is that the procedure (she has helped start a company named Rapunzel to develop it) will eventually become another lunchtime cosmetic treatment. Once a patient has had her cells harvested and cultured, they could be stored indefinitely; then, after giving her doctor a month’s notice (the time it takes to grow the million needed), she could pop in for injections. Costs would likely be on par with hair transplants, roughly $10,000 and up.

Androgenetic alopecia – in women, hair generally thins in the top, frontal area, just behind the hair line, but stays thick at the back. An enzyme causes conversion of the male sex hormone testosterone to another hormone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), causing the hair follicles to produce thinner hair until they stop.

Jimenez JJ, et al. Efficacy and safety of a low-level laser device in the treatment of male and female pattern hair loss: A multicenter, randomized, sham device-controlled, double-blind study. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology. 2014;15:115. www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 9, 2015.

Hair loss can affect just your scalp or your entire body. It can be the result of heredity, hormonal changes, medical conditions or medications. Anyone — men, women and children — can experience hair loss.

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